Budnitz Bicycles No. 2

Budnitz Bicycles No. 2

You might not recognize the name of Paul Budnitz, but you may be more familiar with his incredibly popular designer toy, apparel and lifestyle label, Kidrobot. Since 2002, Paul has been collaborating with some of the world’s most talented artists to produce a wide range of characters such as Dunny, Munny and a slew of others—some of whom have been selected by New York’s Museum Of Modern Art for their permanent collection. Not content with generating a worldwide cult of toys, Paul is now venturing into the realm of the custom bicycle.

The range already consists of two models, No. 1 and No. 2, the latter of which is featured here. Both frames are titanium, and equipped with a Gates carbon belt drive and a top-shelf selection of Chris King, Phil Wood and Paul Components. No. 2 sports a 26″ rear wheel and a 29″ on the front, and is touted as a ‘BMX bike for adults’, which is enough for me. Citing Aston Martins and 80s-era Maseratis as inspiration, the sinewy lines of Budnitz Bikes certainly cut dashing figures. You’ll have to get in the queue if you like the look of them, however. The first production run sold out immediately, with the next expected to be ready by Fall 2011. More information on the Budnitz Bicycles website.

PS: I’d like to take a moment to thank our latest advertiser, Shhh! Bikes. Their pastel Fruit Tingle frame is very pleasing to the eye. Expect a full photo shoot and review here shortly. Take a look around their website, they’re helping to keep Cycle EXIF’s wheels turning.

Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2
Budnitz Bicycles No. 2

  • Keir Whitcher

    Nice looking machine but just disturbed that 80s Maseratis were considered inspirational.  Hideous 222s and the like.  Lets just remember the great stuff of the 70s, the Bora, Ghibli and Indy.

  • What an elegant frame. But the four bolts holding it together at the seat stays make me irrationally nervous.  I’ll take mine with a good ol’ chain and no breaks in the frame.

  • Dear Mr. Budnitz,

    I’m sorry to say that I won’t be placing an order for one of your current offerings.

    It’s not because I think the bikes are poorly made or of inferior quality. It’s not that at all. From the pictures I can see that Lynskey’s manufacturing is top notch, and the component selection is second to none (although I would have chosen Phil hubs). Really, what it boils down to is that I find your designs to be uninspired. I guess given your background I might have had higher expectations.  While companies like Jones and Black Sheep are innovating you have seemingly chosen to reference 50’s Ballooners for your designs (Starliner, Schwinn Cantilever). 
     
    Better luck with No 3…

    • Carlos Guerra

      I agree.

      The first time I saw this bycicle, I thought in Jeff Jones and Black Sheep, so I also think that the designer, due to his background, could have innovated a bit more.

  • Apertome

    Tough crowd! I think it’s gorgeous. Perhaps not hugely innovative, but to my eye a unique and pleasing mix of old & new. Beach cruiser-ish, but in titanium with belt drive & disc brakes. Very nice.

    • double ohtwo

      Thank you, Apertome, for the voice of reason! I concur, considering that Paul Budnitz’s bicycles could have ended up very colorful, very bold and similar in style to his line of toys… We now have a range of bikes that are monochromatic and quite stylish.

  • steve olsen

    This bike looks like a good time. If I could afford one, I think I would go for the Budnitz before a Jones or Black Sheep. Sorry guys. I’m not that hardcore. I just think this bike is beautiful and I would love to have one here in NYC. It’s really stunning…