Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer

Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer

If you decide to go touring through the wilds of northwest America and Canada, one of the dangers that must be accounted for is puma concolor. The cougar is the second heaviest cat in the New World after the jaguar and lurks in branches and rocks above trails that are common to both four-legged beasts and two-wheeled adventurers.

When Ollie Blackmore approached Tom Donhou for a gravel-grinding tourer to carry him on his Cycle Challenge Canada, a cancer charity fund-raising-loop around Vancouver Island, Tom responded — not only with a custom frame, but a totemic paint scheme to ward off a potentially hungry big cat.

Cycle Challenge Canada is the name of Ollie’s 2,311km ride, in which he will attempt to raise $25,000 for the BC Cancer Foundation. He will be the first person ever to cycle solo and unaided around Vancouver Island — slightly less than the Tour de France in the same period, without a team car or a rest day. He’ll climb the height of Everest 5 times, camping in the wild.

A lot of that distance will be on disused logging roads, fully loaded with around 35kg of equipment. His custom Donhou Cycle is up for the challenge: Tom built him a fillet-brazed thru-axle tourer with Avid mechanical disc brakes and mounting for all necessary racks and cages. The hardware is just as reliable: a SRAM Force groupset with Chris King bearings and Thomson seat mast and stem.

You can donate to Ollie’s adventure on the Cycle Challenge Canada website and follow along via the Facebook page (where you can support by buying a fine jersey that features the same totem graphics by Gus Farnes). You can see more pics in the Donhou Cycles gallery and contact Tom for your own adventure mobile.

Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer
Donhou Cycles Totem Tourer

  • jeremynorth

    I am fed up with people doing all of this fun stuff in the name of “charity”. Let’s face it, he’s doing it for himself, and getting other people to subsidise his experience, with any excess going to a good cause.
    If he were to do 2,300 Km round his own town or on a trainer, he would be able to make more for charity as it would incur substantially less outlay.

    Sorry to be so negative, but charity is, by its definition, altruistic.

    • James

      Great idea! But there’s just a chance he might still enjoy himself that way. I think he should go instead for a sponsored flogging, or even better, saw his own arm off for charity. But above all we must ensure nobody ever enjoys themselves while raising money for others.

      • jeremynorth

        I take it from that, you’ll be giving his ‘good cause’ a lot of money then, given the sacrifice he’s making.

        So what motivates us to give money to charity anyway? The need of the people who need the money, or the feats that others perform in order to raise the money. Will you for example not donate the money if he doesn’t complete the ride? Will you donate the money if he doesn’t even start? Does that mean that the charity deserves the money depending on his effort rather than their needs?

        Do you see what I’m getting at?

        • James

          No I don’t.

          By doing this he is giving the charity publicity, and with a bit of luck, they should raise more money than they would have otherwise done. If, as it appears, this is a good and worthwhile charity, then it takes some pretty perverse logic to see his efforts as anything other than a good thing.

          • jeremynorth

            You didn’t answer my other questions. Will you be donating to his charity whether or not he finishes his ride? Will you give money to his charity now that you know it is a good cause and he doesn’t need to ride, as he has done the publicity?

          • Guest

            your just a little ray of light, aren’t you?

          • jeremynorth

            At least write english correctly if you are to comment. I infer that you meant ‘you’re’ not as you wrote ‘your’.

            Did you note that James did not answer any of my questions? I am not at all against charitable giving, far from it. I feel that charity should not have conditions put upon it, nor should anyone else profit from it.

  • Fuzz

    Back to the bike……..

    I just noticed the thru axles all round, on a steel frame! awesome.
    Looks like a 142×12 rear as well, would be interesting to see how this affects clearances with road crank q factor along with chain-line issues.

    I want one with a horizontal TT

    Nice bike

    • BigHank53

      It’s very pretty, but I’m not able to see the problem that thru axles solve. Unless you want to count the crappy excuses for quick-release skewers that have been fobbed off on us for the last twenty years as a problem…