Frera Bella

Frera Bella

All the Cordura® and Velcro® in the world can’t replace the sumptuous tactility of leather. Of course, those man-made materials have a place in situations when it is impractical and, occasionally, dangerous to rely on leather, which needs fastidious care to sustain an equal infallibility. Poland’s Bartosz Grabowicz crafts cycling accessories that exude a quality that Cordura® can only dream of.

Frera Bella

There are numerous craftspeople around the world who have rediscovered the beauty of leatherwork and the authenticity they endow upon our beautiful bicycles. Australia’s Busyman Bicycles and Patebury spring to mind, and Bartosz obviously has skills that are of their equal. He recently restored a lovely ladies bike by Frera, one of the world’s oldest bicycle manufacturers, as a model for his wares.

Frera Bella

Frera has been producing bicycles and motorcycles since 1905, setting them in the same realm as other Italian concerns who specialised in those areas, like Ducati, Bianchi and Aprilia. Their catalog is now filled with a eye-burning array of hydro-formed alloy frames and logos to match but Bartosz’ machine recaptures a more romantic era.

Frera Bella

Found as a wreck, Bartosz re-chromed and painted the Columbus Aelle steel frame and rebuilt it with a selection of period parts, like Shimano’s 105 Golden Arrow groupset, Mavic Wheels, 3ttt and Stronglight. A custom stainless steel front rack is a perfect display for his hand-stitched bags, matched with a reupholstered San Marco Rolls saddle and leather grips.

Head to the website of GB Leather, Bartosz’ business, for more details. His range includes toe straps, D-lock holsters, belts and glasses cases, and he also offers a bespoke service.

Frera Bella

  • Phillip

    Too many out of focus shots and poor angled photos ruin and otherwise interesting bicycle. To who ever shoots like this my advice would be to try smaller apertures or getting closer up with wider lenses. When shooting a bicycle there is no excuse for out of focus or short focus field shots. As a rule make sure the components logos are in focus and shoot at an angle that presents more detail as to design. When the content is based upon product type photos nothing is worse than very amateur photography.

    • beholder

      I disagree entirely. I think the photographer has artfully drawn the eye to the details of interest, and provided sufficient overview of the bicycle with his distant shot, and comprehensive collection of detail shots.

      • Phillip

        No it’s not artfully done if it is poorly shot. If the the photographer was trying to focus only on the details of interest then it should have been framed or cropped accordingly. But it is apparent that the depth of field is quite shallow. For example even the pedal attached to the crank is out of focus and the detail on the crank can’t be read. Thee is no excuse for poor product photography other than a very inexperienced photographer with a cellphone camera. If cellphone photography is your thing then I guess I have no argument. It is merely my opinion that the bicycle deserved to be presented in focus.

        • Kristofer

          Never read this kind of stupid words 🙂

        • Bjornturun

          Thanks for the tips, I can see exactly what you mean. I will try to take on board what you say when taking photographs at l’Eroica.

    • David

      If the subject in question was the bicycle, then yes, bad photography. However, the subject of the article and therefore the photographs is the leatherwork. The leatherwork is well presented to the viewer, and the bicycle is there simply to ‘set the scene’.
      Perfectionist Phillip has obviously read his “Photography for Dummies” manual and in doing so he has forgotten what the actual subject matter of the artical is all about. I am sure Phillip will return to validate his professional opinon.
      Well done Mr Photograher, I like your work.

  • David

    If the subject in question was the bicycle, then yes, bad photography. However, the subject of the article and therefore the photographs is the leatherwork. The leatherwork is well presented to the viewer, and the bicycle is there simply to ‘set the scene’.
    Perfectionist Phillip has obviously read his “Photography for Dummies” manual and in doing so he has forgotten what the actual subject matter of the artical is all about. I am sure Phillip will return to validate his professional opinon.
    Well done Mr Photograher, I like your work.