Geekhouse Woodville

Geekhouse Prolly Woodville

One of the most important bikes presented at the 2011 North American Handmade Bicycle Show was this randonneur by Boston’s Geekhouse Bikes. Not just because of the incredible amount of effort that went into TIG welding the triple-triangle, S&S coupled frame, or the impressively perfect paint. This bike is significant because it was contracted by John Watson, denizen of the fixed freestyle world and editor of the blog, Prolly Is Not Probably.

Nothing out of the ordinary about that, of course. What I was most impressed about John’s decision to invest in a handmade frame was that he opted for a randonneur. While the ‘Biking Viking’ could have requested the world’s most beautiful track or fixed street frame, he’s obviously looking forward to putting in some serious miles and devoting some holidays to bicycle touring. The choice of Marty Walsh’s Geekhouse Bikes is also relevant. The Boston-based shop is renowned for its innovative and funky approach to the classic art of the handmade bicycle. Here is a randonneur that thousands of Prolly’s subscribers (predominantly a youthful, urban, active, stylish, cashed up audience with their finger on the pulse) can look at and desire. It’s high time that long-distance bicycle touring was graced with a fresh role model; kudos to John Watson and Geekhouse Bikes for (hopefully) inspiring fixed gear fans to take more of an interest in this aspect of our glorious sport.

No, there isn’t a drive-side profile shot. These shots were taken at the Geekhouse Bikes booth at Austin’s NAHBS which rendered it impossible for that essential shot. You can, however, view more details on Prolly’s flickr set, and a full spec sheet is listed on his blog. Thanks also to John for his untiring coverage of the event, for those of us unable to make it, it was the most comprehensive exposure to the incredible works of engineering on display.

Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville
Geekhouse Prolly Woodville

  • Timothy

    I must be missing something because this is plain ugly. I’m sure the craftsmenship is superb but is the scruffy, unfinished look supposed to be cool and ironic?

  • Anonymous

    I actually like the contrast of finished/rough surfaces and old/new. And I’m digging the seat cluster. The only misstep (to my eye) is the ungainly jog where the seatstay meets the dropout. That and you might want to rethink the VO bottle cage under the downtube. I like it’s look, but perhaps not robust enough for underside duty?

  • Semilog

    Internal cable routing with an S&S coupler sounds like big fun for setup/takedown.

    Not.

  • the fork

    That bike is a hot mess, and somehow manages to look remarkably sloppy in spite of all the obvious effort put into it. One too many bottles of Jameson were consumed when designing it, obviously – it looks like a parts-bin special made from tubing remnants. And you’re making a point of showing off how your cables rub up against the couplings? Really? Maybe you’re exactly right – the cashed up trendoid hipster with more money than sense will probably love everything their idol tells them to love, and this is the likely proof.

  • jp

    I agree this bike just isn’t pretty. I also think s-bend seatstays aren’t coherent with rando bikes.

  • D2237

    Where’s the motor, OOOh damn I signed onto cycle exif instead of bike exif. My bad.

  • Graememcg

    My main problem here is that they’ve stuck a bottle of Jamieson’s on it. Surely a bike this fancy deserves a single malt? An Ardbeg or at least a Laphroaig?

    • George

      It’s Jameson’s 12 yr, and quite tasty.