Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer

Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer

It’s always interesting to hear of interests that cyclists pursue, whether it’s playing in a band, cooking or creating artwork. The background of Horse Cycles’ Thomas Callahan is that of a multimedia artist, which, to those who can see it, lends an extra perspective to his frames. This stainless steel tourer is the latest from his stable, which goes a long way in demonstrating his proficiency in this media.

The aim was to create a light weight tourer with a reliable front end, able to heft a loaded handlebar bag which, let’s face it, is all you need for a weekend away on the bike. Thomas fabricated the racks himself from nickel plated 4130 tubes, the rear designed with guards to protect the cantilever brakes from swaying panniers. An LED rear light was machined in-house to match the Schmidt E6 front lamp.

The frame was constructed from True Temper tubing, with Reynolds 953 for the rear triangle. The drive train consists of Shimano’s Ultegra group and a 105 triple crankset, while a Brooks saddle and bar tape complete the ensemble. The top cap incorporates a compass: an essential piece of kit for the touring cyclist. Check out more details on the Horse Cycle website.

Big thanks to fellow Brooklyn local Nate Mumford for the photography.

Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer
Horse Cycles Stainless Tourer

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  • http://spinynorman.tumblr.com Spiny Norman

    All that and no fenders? A giant front rack on a long-trail fork? A compass on a steel frame that will make it read incorrectly? Nice workmanship, but this bike confuses me.

    • http://www.facebook.com/dimypap Dim-itri’os Ev-angelos Pap’the

      unless the frame is magnetised it won’t read wrong.!. why would it.?. (all compasses were in metallic cases as far as i know… not.?.) & why on earth would the frame be magnetised.?. because it’s steel.?.
      p.s.: if you’re so sure & i’m wrong please explain it to me…

      • http://spinynorman.tumblr.com Spiny Norman

        A compass is just a magnet on a pivot. Magnets are attracted to steel. Think of a magnet on a refrigerator door. The door is not magnetized.

  • Onelesspedestrian

    single legs on the rear rack is a bit baffling as well, all those tubes and no truss work for strength? Also, the wire for the headlight couldn’t be tucked into the rack and hidden? The spiral wrap job makes it look like an afterthought or a stock bike.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dimypap Dim-itri’os Ev-angelos Pap’the

    i dig the racks .!. totally .!. they have this awesome avant-garde-ish futuristic design in the spirit of the early 20th … pedals are cool too ; & compass is a great idea ! ; like the watch on green-gold Llewellyn randonneur from the ACBS posted a few weeks ago …

  • Mr_Bridge

    As a frame & forks, I honestly love it. I like the general feel of the racks too. Paint colour = awesome. As a ‘build’, I’m close to grinding all of my teeth out over all the fudged details. It starts with the tyre labels (misaligned), rim labels (take them off) and finishes somewhere near the rear end of that rear rack that doesn’t follow the arc of the rear wheel, at all. Add a hideous Shimano hollow crankset and tape the bars unevenly just to show off a Nitto logo, and it’s enough to give me a nervous tic.

  • Bryan

    Those have to be the ugliest racks I’ve ever seen. And who put this thing together? Brake pads are backwards. Wiring for the front light is hideous. No fenders? I’m not impressed.