Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

This year, during the 2014 Tour de France, I had the pleasure of visiting Mike Pearson of London’s Munin Bikeworks. Mike is a recent graduate of The Bicycle Academy, England’s centre of learning for aspiring framebuilders. With only a few frames under his belt, Mike is one of a number dedicated to upholding the great British tradition of the handmade bicycle.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

In his own words:

“Some people say that running mudguards ruins the aesthetics of a bike. Challenge accepted.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

“Built for my personal use, I wanted a fast and smooth bike for group riding and lightweight touring when the British weather was less than perfect. Which is most of the time, if we’re honest.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

“Making the mudguards an integral part of the design was important to the overall look, and partly dictated the paint scheme. The colours reflect what you would hope to see in a day of winter riding. The dark, a touch of early frost on the fields, blue sky.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

“It’s fillet-brazed from Columbus Zona with a Columbus Hiver fork. The stainless steel rear dropouts come from Llewellyn, with the clamping surfaces polished and masked during spraying.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

“This prevents the ugly scoring of the paint finish you can get from the clamping process. Wheels are H Plus Son running on Hope hubs, built by August Wheelworks.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

“I could have called this the Phoenix. The very first frame I built was designed to do a similar job, but it was stolen after only 100 miles of use. This one runs on similar lines, but better. I feel it reflects how my confidence as a builder has grown over the last 12 months.”

Having a bike stolen is a traumatic experience. But, like a phoenix, the ashes are there to be risen from. And Mike is doing a fine job of resurrecting inspiration from the flames. See more on the Munin Bikeworks website and Instagram.

Munin Bikeworks All Seasons

  • Giulio Ungaretti

    what brand are the mudguards ?

    • Mike Pearson

      Hiya Giulio.

      The mudguards are SKS Chromoplastics in a narrow width. They are suitable (just about) for 28mm tyres, but 25mm are a far more comfortable fit. I’m running 25mm Continental GP4000S on the bike.

  • tertius_decimus

    You know, the hate against fenders fades away with the first ride when it’s wet. When I was a child, I thought fenders look hideous on my bikes, so I took them off. The very first pouring rain made me feel shame about that decision. My back was covered in mud from the very bottom to the hindhead. Lesson learnt. I like fenders. They’re purposeful and sometimes add “something” to the style, like this particular bike nicely shows.

    • Exactly so. Fender hate is for two kinds of people: (1) freds who only ride when it’s sunny; (2) wackos who enjoy road slime and grit up their backside for hours at a time.

      Good fenders have the added benefit of keeping the drivetrain a lot cleaner, and thereby reducing wear.

  • Tamaso

    Lovely bike! The height of the front fender end pictured is still going to allow a LOTof water and road grit to be thrown onto the drivetrain and riders feet, as set up. Adding a mud flap that extended down much closer to the ground will improve the performance of the fenders a great deal here. If you’re riding pavement, you can get it down within 1 inch or so; you’d want the mud flap higher/shorter if you are off-road, to avoid catching debris.

    Could even be a nice opportunity to complement the color scheme with a flap that was blue or included some kind of striping / accent. 🙂

    • Mike Pearson

      Yeah, these ones don’t have the front flap that another set I own do. I’m not sure why! I may swap onto ones with the longer flap for the reasons you mention.

      • Tamaso

        It is pretty easy to make your own flaps by cutting rubber/vinyl/leather to size and bolting it on. If you designed them, or got someone else to, in a way that tied into your colors/aesthetic on the build it would add quite a nice touch and something that I haven’t seen on many rigs.

  • sss

    When I think of integrated mudguards I think of the French constructeurs. Nice bike but SKS chromoplastics just dont fit with the rest of the bike.

    • Mike Pearson

      Respectfully, I have to disagree with you there. There are functional and design constraints that mean to my mind that Chromoplastics are ideal. They are light, tough, blend into the tyres, have decent side coverage to restrict spray and also are narrow enough to just about squeeze between the fork blades.

      I looked at other options, but none were particularly suitable. I would have liked to have tried Portland Design Works fenders, but they only rate them for 23mm tyres.

      I’d be interested to know of any alternatives you’d recommend though. I’m always keen to broaden my knowledge of the range of components I can work with.

  • James-o

    Really nice job Mark. I’d say it fulfills the brief of integrating the guards very well and SKS are a good choice on a bike like this.