Pinarello Montello SL

Pinarello Montello SL

If you know your x-heights from your em dashes, there’s a possibility you’ll recognize the name of the owner of this Pinarello Montello SL. His name is Abi Huynh—a typographer and designer of exceptional skill. A browse through his portfolio demonstrates his acute ability to drop words on a page using the most legible layouts, so it’s no surprise that his pristine Pinny shares the same respect for clean lines and white space.

Abi now resides and works in Vancouver, after a stint in NYC and an education in Amsterdam. He acquired his Montello from a fellow Vancouverite who is also a Pinarello aficionado. “According to the previous owner this was a custom ordered frame by a team but never painted. The geometry is slightly different than a ‘standard’ Montello, slightly longer wheelbase overall. Instead of Columbus SLX, this Montello was built with Columbus SL.

“When I saw the frame I fell in love and wanted to build it up with one of my favourite group sets, Dura-Ace 7700. Although some would object to Shimano components on an Italian frame, I just loved the way the polished 7700 group set looks with the frame. The Pinarello pantographed stem was a lucky find but the 3ttt 25.4 clamp diameter limited my handlebar choices. Luckily, I have found the Nitto B105 is incredibly comfortable.”

It would be interesting to hear Abi’s thoughts on the evolution of Giovanni Pinarello’s branding, from the iconic serif face that has been the envy of riders since the Miguel Indurain era, to the modern logotype gracing the Dogma frames that have won the last two Tour de France events. Special thanks to Abi for the photography.

Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL
Pinarello Montello SL

  • David Evans

    Eek

  • Phillip

    Shimano components on this Pinarello? Why? Like putting Ford parts on a Ferrari … well to each his own as they say.

    • n416

      That is an awful analogy.

  • g2000

    Im all for DA or Ultegra on an italian if it gets you out on your bike. Not everyone can spring 2x the cost for used campag. 9 speed Shimano is infinitely more available and durable than campag. Especially in the states where Campag is waaaaaay overvalued.

    • ahuynh

      Yeah, I chose Dura-Ace because I wanted to ride this and not have as a collectors item / show piece. In my area Campy is very expensive, an ’80/’81 Record group set (8 speed) would have cost me hundreds more than the 7700 set. I opted to go for a bit more ‘modern’ components that would offer a better ride than 80’s Campagnolo. Don’t get me wrong though, I run vintage Campagnolo on my Bianchi Superleggera and I love it, but I also appreciate the precision engineering and shifting of the Dura-Ace group sets.

      I don’t really understand the thinking that I can’t use Italian parts on a Miyata or vintage Suntour Pro on an Italian pista. For me I appreciate good components no matter the make. Didn’t the Colnago 50th anniversary bikes come with either Campagnolo or Shimano groups? Someone should tell Colnago they committed sacrilege! In the same vein, I think someone needs to tell Team Sky they are running Ford parts on their Ferrari’s.

      • itsmefool

        Dude, it’s your bike and you run whatever the heck you want on it! Nice bike and way to address the haters…keep up the good (both with type and bikes)!

  • Rangga Panji

    Those Paul interrupter levers are a downer for me. otherwise, it’s a nice build.

    • David Evans

      Yeah, those don’t go with a classic bike build at all – more of a fixie thing surely? Also, the all-white or polished metal theme is too, well, theme-y for me. I don’t mind Shaminao parts on an italian frame, that’s fine, but picking a colur theme and sticking with it right the way down to the tyres?! No thanks