Rapha Continental

Rapha Continental

Ira Ryan, in an interview on the Rapha website, mentions that Quality is elusive. The search to attain Quality, or arête — as the Greeks describe it, continues to push us to excel and discover what we are capable of. Ira also considers that independent frame builders embody that search. This collaboration between legendary Portland builders, Ira Ryan and Tony Pereira, only serves to prove that point.

It’s not such a long-winded notion. The Greeks believed that the mind, body and soul each had to be developed and prepared for a man to live a life of arête. Anyone who has endured a physical trial like a long distance bicycle tour, for instance, is aware of the refined view of the world this can achieve.

The Rapha Continental riders regularly perform such epic feats, with a mission to document America’s most beautiful rides. Ira Ryan and Tony Pereira are not only 5-year-long members of the Rapha Continental squad and hardened long distance riders, they’re also builders who produce award-winning frames. They collaborated here to produce a bike specifically designed to conquer such rides. This ‘all-weather, all-terrain, all-the-time’ Continental will be sold as a complete bike only, marketed through Rapha’s ‘Bicycle Collection’.

The components consist of an SRAM Force gruppo, Chris King hubs, head set and bottom bracket, an FSA cockpit and, for the inevitable, the Topeak Road Master Blaster pump. It retails for US$5,000 and you can click through to order it via the Rapha Bicycle site, where you can also read Ira and Tony’s credentials.

Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental
Rapha Continental

  • steve

    A 5k bicycle that doesn’t even come with pedals? I’m sorry, I’ve had enough of this pretentious nonsense. Goodbye, cycle exif

    • Sorry to hear that, Steve. Have a look back through some previous posts, at Cycle EXIF we try to cater for every taste. And I daresay we’ll be featuring some old shitters in the future. What sort of bikes would you prefer to see on Cycle EXIF?

      • steve

        I have been a loyal follower of your site from the beginning, but I think you are losing the plot. I ride a bike which cost about 100 dollars (used) and has running gear so cheap it doesn’t even have a name on it. Most cyclists, if they are honest, probably do something similar. IT IS NOT AN OLD SHITTER. It is an honest machine that does an honest job. If I were rich enough to spend serious money on toys I would look for an hellenic curly fork Hetchins, (and not dare park it anywhere) but I am not. Show dream bikes by all means (we all need dreams) but this Rapha is just a bike, and I wouldn’t swap mine for it

        • Steve, I was not inferring that your bike was an old shitter, I was referring to some other old bikes on this blog that I have featured in the past and possible in the future. There are many beautiful bikes on this planet, Steve, and regardless of condition, age, or specification, I intend to feature as many of them as I possibly can. My personal ride is an old On-One il Pompino single speed that has a shitty old rack, beat up riser bars, untrue rims and a scuffed saddle. I rode to Melbourne from Sydney on it, and still commute on it. I wouldn’t swap it for a Rapha Continental but I would still like one in the garage.

          Sorry Steve, it is all about the ride.

  • Christopher A Moyer

    I think you’re doing fine – keep up the good work.

  • Erik Hendrick

    Phew! Stunning! That is one of the most desirable bikes ever! Obviously built to rack up miles on, and beautiful looking! Me wantee!

  • Wergraph

    Best bicycle blog ever – puts a smile on my face every day

  • Nice bike, no doubt. Who wants a race/ride a “continental” bike what is overweight steel pudding and too expensive? Modern (not talking about ugly sloping frames) carbon frames are far lighter, offer the same riding comfort that steel does + are much lighter and stiffer. The bike above must be for -only- rapha fan boys.

    • Mat

      That’s a lovely bike. I bet if you jettison the fenders and pump, then put some 23c tyres on it, it would be, gee at least 600gms more than a comparably equipped carbon bike that is made in the thousands and re-badged a million times as several different bikes.
      Thanks goodness for handmade bikes and sensible craftsmen who know that if you worry about how much your bike weighs, you’re missing the point.

  • Peter W. Polack

    I think some of the posters above have lost sight of what this bike will be used for.

    This bike was built with the Rapha Continental-style rides featured on their web site. These rides can be VERY hilly, ridden on gravel/dirt roads, and in all weather, necessitating lower gears, wider tires, and fenders. None of these conditions are suited to 23mm tired, carbon racing bikes.

    I’ve had the opportunity to ride a couple of the routes Rapha features on their web site, specifically the Litchfield CT and D2R2 180km routes. They are UGLY, and no place for a Tour de France capable bike. I agree; the Rapha bike is pricy and heavy on marketing frilliness, but it fits the bill for those cyclists who have drunk the Rapha Kool-Aid and participate in such epic rides. Pure road bikes would be in over their heads on such epics.