Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross

Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross

For those of us who anxiously reload the Vanilla Bicycles flickr page, hoping for an update on what’s new around the Portland workshop, this week has seen our cups runneth over. This single-speed cyclocross bike is the second cream machine to appear within a week, the first being a road bike with virtually the same livery. Both are perfect examples of why there’s a 4-5 year wait list for a Vanilla.

Portland photographer Bob Huff perfectly captured the details that make the work of Sacha White so desirable, like laser-cut rear dropouts with imperfect paint like lovers lips — and the discreet branding on the undercarriage and fork tips. The thick paint gives the frame the resemblance of ice-cream, with a custom stem and matching Chris King components making a perfect accompaniment.

Special thanks to Bob for the fine photography. See more his website and the Vanilla Workshop flickr.

Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross
Vanilla Bicycles Cream Cross

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Neil-Fenton/510186736 Neil Fenton

    Fine work

  • stric

    Nice work, but 4-5 year wait list… for what… c’mon!

  • apfrancis

    Thou shalt match thy seatpost with thy stem. No but seriously, gorgeous bike!

  • http://spinynorman.tumblr.com Spiny Norman

    The “4-5 year wait list” is part of the Vanilla marketing strategy: it implies scarcity and exclusivity. Nothing (or not much) against the Vanilla frames themselves, but there are *so* many equally good or superior builders who can deliver in a year or less… I could name several within walking distance of the Vanilla shop and scores across the US, without effort.

    • stric

      I agree. I live in Portland and there are quite a few great frame builders in the Pacific NW who can deliver equal or better frames in much shorter time (a few weeks). I like classic steel frames but 4-5 these ridiculous wait lists are insane. And in the end they only make a few dozen frames per year. Independent Fabrications and Seven – just to name a few – make so much more (hundreds, if not thousands) and they are still custom and insanely beautiful. Vanilla bikes are nice. Don’t get me wrong, but I think that they are way over-rated.

    • mattprovidence

      it is highly belittling to call sacha’s time-consuming craftmanship a “marketing strategy.” sure, you can walk around the corner in PDX, where i live, and find a handful of framebuiders who all build stellar bikes that ride terrific, but there’s

      an unparalleled commitment to aesthetic and craft that elevates vanillas to a higher plane. there’s a fine line between craft and art and sacha’s bikes–and those from bishop, dinucci, weigle, and gordon, to name a few–certainly blur that line. As for “exclusivity,” Sacha started the HIGHLY democratic speedvagen line–you can get a speedvagen in a few months.

      this cross bike is absolutely perfect. it is beautiful (proportions, paint, and parts), well crafted, and highly functional. it looks ready to shred. period.

      • Spiny Norman

        1. “Highly belittling.” What does that even mean?
        2. I stand by my comments. Limiting the choices just to Oregon, I’d take a bike from England or Ryan or Merz or Newlands or Pryor or Slawta or Levy or Lyon over a Vanilla. That’s just Oregon, and it’s by no means a comprehensive list. Most or all of these folks would deliver the bike in less than a year, too. Let alone a preposterous 4 or 5 years!
        3.You learn something every day. Today I learned that you can get Vanilla Kool-Aid.

        • Spiny Norman

          Oh, and 4. You know what’s belittling? Your absurd implication that Sacha is working at a “higher plane” of “unparalleled” craftsmanship or artistry or aesthetic sensibility than any of the builders I just mentioned, or dozens of builders that I didn’t mention. That’s belittling and it reveals a genuinely profound ignorance of those who have shaped and continue to shape some of the best bikes ever made, anywhere, by anyone.

          • Adrian Salter

            Shut up dude

        • Spiny Norman

          …or Ahearne or Ryan or Ramsland or Pereira or Buescher & Clark… and we’re still not close to a complete list. And we haven’t even crossed the borders south into California or north into Washington yet… let alone Colorado, Utah, Iowa, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, NY, BC… And still, we’re in North America. Then there are the amazing builders in Japan, Italy, France, England, Switzerland, Australia, and many other places besides… but mattprovidence has the unmitigated gall to describe young Sacha’s talents as “unparalleled.”

          None of this is to say Sacha’s not good. He is good. Very. But he’s not the best, and frankly, he’s not even among the best, yet. Give him a couple of decades and we’ll see if his frames can stand beside, say, DiNucci’s torchwork from the late ’70s or the finest work out of Lyon’s shop across more than three decades. We’ll see if Sacha’s influence on bicycle design matches that of Merz or DiNucci or Lyon; if his frames show the longevity after extraordinary amounts of use and abuse that Levy’s have; if they collect the palmares on road and track that the frames of England and Newlands and Slawta have. Then, we’ll see. For now, what we have is a good young frame builder with a great work ethic and a nearly preternatural sense of branding (look at all those laser-cut V’s; like a bird, if you put one on, it must be art!).

  • Adrian Salter

    Why wait 5 years when you can walk into a shop and buy a Giant X bike today?

  • Crazypandakills

    Nice