Vendetta Cycles The Abyss

Vendetta Cycles The Abyss

The name of Vendetta Cycles may not be the first that springs to mind when thinking of the Portland handmade bicycle scene, but Conor Buescher and Garrett Clark have been creating finely crafted and elegant road warriors since 2004, including numerous women’s specific frames. This is the latest and it will destroy any misconceptions you have about what you think a ‘ladies bike’ should be.

Each Vendetta Cycle is built around a theme: a color or a personal request from the customer. A Portland local, Cindy wanted hers to remind her of the ocean while she rides. A set of Columbus Zona tubes were assembled and sent to the painters, who applied a sapphire candy coat over a metallic gold base and transparent blue. A Darrell ‘Llewellyn’ McCulloch stem kit was matched to the frame.

The ornate lugs made popular by the artisan builders of Britain during the 50s are a Vendetta Cycles specialty — those adorning The Abyss are stainless steel and have been polished to a mirror finish. NOS 10 speed Campagnolo components were combined with White Industries cranks and a hand built wheelset for perfect performance, topped off with custom leather bar wrap by Ray at Handlebra.

You can contact Conor and Garrett through the Vendetta Cycles website, where you can see more details of The Abyss and the rest of their bikes. If you’re heading to the 2013 NAHBS, you can see their craftsmanship in person at Booth #810.

PS: Make sure your year is organized and admire the best bikes of Cycle EXIF at the same time with the 2013 Custom Bicycle Calendar. Order your copy here.

Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss
Vendetta Cycles The Abyss

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  • Onelesspedestrian

    The closeup shots are glorious, I especially like the dropout and seat cluster detail. The lug embellishment is great too, and goes great with the deep looking paint job.

    The wide shots totally lose my interest though. I’m baffled as to why though…. Maybe the black chainrings, sofa seat, tall stack of headset spacers, mile long chainstays…. it looks like a buget/beginner road bike you’d find in the dusty back corner of any shop when looking from afar, but then I come back to the closeups and I’m in love again.

    • Filly-fuzz

      Yeah same feelings here too.
      I do dig longer stays though but I think I have found the culprit………

      90’s metallic paint

    • adie.mitchell

      agreed, except that i dont even like the ornate lugs…so it is a lose-lose situation. and that seat….
      also, i dont think the blue background helps with the wide angle shots

  • jackson_k

    Love the look of this bike, really beautifully constructed, however the my only hang up is that the Vendetta logo is quite gaudy.

  • Fernando

    Dat stem. Is that an oversize head tube?

    But chromed lugs are getting old, at least for me.

  • http://spinynorman.tumblr.com Spiny Norman

    Odd and weirdly refreshing to see a hand-built out of Oregon with no tabs for fenders. I like the color and a rider should put on whatever saddle works for his or her riding. That is an area of criticism that should be strictly off-limits, really.

    I do agree with others about the shiny lugs. They look truly good in only a few settings. Old Mondia frames come to mind. Often, though, they just look gaudy, like chrome toe-caps on patent pumps. Also agree with others about the stack of spacers. This seems a case where the ST should have been higher, or — since a custom stem was used — a one-piece stem with integral spacer could have been employed.

  • Dael Franke

    hmmm the Vendetta logo has radial symmetry. Agreed, a bit gaudy. I think the polished lugs are particularly effective here; they look like the light froth at the edge of a wave.