Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF

Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF

1998 was a good year for Volvo-Cannondale team rider, David Vasquez. The final placing of the UCI Downhill round found him on the second tier of the podium, below the indomitable Frenchman, Nicolas Vouilloz. Round 4 was held at the Big Bear Lake course in California, where the 19 year-old Spaniard whisked the leader’s jersey from Nico’s shoulders to bask in the sun from the top step of the podium.

A contributing factor was the (literally) ground-breaking technology Cannondale incorporated into the 1998 Super V DHF, further cementing the Pennsylvanian manufacturer’s reputation as a major innovator. From 150 mm, computerized Moto DH Pro forks (with four suspension maps that can be selected ‘on-the-fly’, and more that can be beamed from the team tent via infra-red), to the compact, four-bar linkage that delivers a dynamic pivot, the Super V DHF was 1998’s poster bike for most aspiring World Champs and wannabe Missy Gioves.

Andy Waterman, Deputy Editor of Privateer Magazine, was in Italy recently for the launch of Cannondale’s 2012 line, where the lawn was graced with some model highlights from previous years. Not only is Andy a driving force behind one of the world’s most cultured and authentic mountain biking mags, he’s also an excellent photographer. The latest issue of Privateer, Number 8, will be available in newsagents on March 15th, but if you subscribe, you’d be reading it now.

Massive thanks, again, to Andy for the photos. He also did a top job of documenting Chris King’s Yeti A.R.C., which you can see here.

Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF
Volvo-Cannondale Super V DHF