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The Teacher’s Approach: Paul Brodie’s Own 27.5 MTB

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

After teaching countless students how to build their own frames, Paul Brodie has finally managed to make something for himself, this rowdy 27.5″ MTB. It’s a personally sentimental creation, too.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Back in the mid-80s, when Paul Brodie began making mountain bike frames for a burgeoning scene, he managed to get one of his Romax models under a talented Canadian racer named Brent Martin.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

The Brodie name was relatively unheard of, and Brent was a bit unsure about the unknown name on his downtube. So he split them in half and plastered ‘Bro’ on one side, and ‘Die’ on the other.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Brent went on to win the ’86 Canadian Championship (with an injured wrist), which kickstarted the brand. The Brodie name was no-longer unheard of and went on to become a very popular manufacturer, both in domestically and internationally.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

That wasn’t the last involvement Brent had with Paul’s work: 24 years later Brent was instrumental in getting Paul to start teaching his popular and long-standing Framebuilding 101 class at the University of the Fraser Valley.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Paul’s new personal bike has a history, too. Around 20 years, ago, Paul got a call from Rocky Mountain, who were looking to sell their entire stock of Tange tubing, including a whole bunch of 1 3/16” Prestige top tubes. Paul took the lot.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Circumstances, however, had other plans, and Paul ended up selling the stock to Mike Truelove in Squamish, who had spent 8 years building Brodie frames. Years passed, and Paul began teaching his class, wishing he still had all that Tange tubing.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

20 years later, Paul began thinking about a mountain bike for himself and needed some material, so called up Mike to see if he had any Tange left. He’d sold most of it, except for the oddball 1 3/16” top tubes. Perfect.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Paul went to work, creating the most up-to-date Brodie MTB ever. The 30.9mm Reynolds seat tube is nickel-silvered, with a Chromoly lug connecting a rolled 4130 tube, and a Columbus down tube with a gentle bend was enlisted.

The rear spacing is 148 boost, connected to the 83mm BB by a 41.5mm chainstay, and there’s an effective seat tube angle of 74° with a 68° head angle. A 100mm RS Reba fork sits up front. The bend in the seat tube nicely compliments the top of the seat tube.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB

Paul sanded, Scotch-Brited and waxed the frame, as he’s thinking of adding a chainstay bridge like he tells his students to do. If you want to see more, or would like information about Framebuilding 101, head to the BC Bike Show in Vancouver this weekend.

Paul Brodie Website | Instagram

Thanks to Darren Stonoski for the portrait of Paul.

The Teacher's Approach: Paul Brodie's Own 27.5 MTB