Bob Jackson End–End

Bob Jackson End–End

Bob Jackson is one custom frame house that can lay claim to a rich cycling heritage as well as the great British tradition of maintaining a completely local industry. J.R.J. Cycles originated in 1935 but underwent a hiatus during World War 2 while Bob served in the Royal Air Force. Since returning to frame building after the war, the history of the business is a long and twisty one.

The marque enjoyed prosperous periods; acquiring the legendary Merlin brand, establishing a popular line of racing frames and building frames for Hetchins, but as Bob aged, so did the fortune of the business. A London businessman bought both the Hetchins name and J.R.J. in the mid 80s, with original members of staff staying behind in consultancy roles of varying depth. The director of J.R.J., Donald Thomas, convinced Bob to assist him in restoring the brand to it’s former glory and created a new workplace environment with a new focus on quality and integrity. Today, all fabrication and painting is done in-house, by hand, to a level that will proudly rival any younger newcomers.

In 1995, Bob Jackson Cycles swelled to a size that required larger premises, which were found in Stanningley Road, Bramley, Leeds. Sadly, Bob died in 1999, but his name continues to live on, with a solid range of track, Audax, road and touring frames. Full customization is offered, including paint and braze-ons. Get in touch via the website. This is Fredrik Holmström’s Audax End–End, and no doubt it sees plenty of Sweden’s countryside. Follow his adventures on his flickr stream.

Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End
Bob Jackson End–End

  • It would look better with non-hammered fenders; the seatpost could be nicer; and the twine wrap is a filthy hippy affectation that absolutely disgusts me. But those quibbles aside, it’s a moderately nice build of a gorgeous frame. 

  • mudplug

    I can’t find any explanation of the name (End-End) so I’m gonna stick my neck out and suggest it might be linked to the epic Land’s End to John O’Groats (LEJOG) route?

    I may be wrong, but if it is then it’s worth a mention!

  • John D

    What a beautiful bike, right out of the 1970’s with a few modern parts and almost too pretty to ride. I like the look of the fenders but they would come off to ride it. A few VO parts, I would install a Cinelli 1A instead of the inferior Nitto stem and the only thing aluminum bottle cages are good for is turning you bottles black, both easily remedied. I’m also happy to NOT see one if those fake Campy Record crank copies name branded by everyone, this bike should be fitted with authentic parts. The bar end shifters are perfect for the riding style intended and I also can’t find levers without plastic bodies but I’m sure they work fine. Such a pleasure to look down at something so fine when you’re slowly ascending a long hill. With just a very few practical alterations it would be ready to ride. Thanks for the lovely pictures of this beautiful bicycle.

  • gill Fraser

    Hi need help have a Bob Jackson frame from
    1975, 531 frame refinished and painted.

    Try to put Super Record 11 speed Campy 2014 bike set the fittings are not working can’t seem to get the bike to shift properly anybody else I can help me or should I just go old school Campy