Bonobo Plywood Bicycle

Bonobo Plywood Bicycle

Forget the budget parts, the color-matched chain/grips/pedal combo which brings back, with a shudder, early memories of our beloved ‘fixie’ craze. Forget the non-driveside shot and even the awkward-looking saddle angle. Kudos to a design and designer who has dared to think outside the triangle, resulting in one of the most successful attempts to reinterpret the classic silhouette.

24 year-old Polish designer Stanisław Płoski studied at the Faculty of Industrial Design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw and the National College of Arts and Design in Dublin, Ireland. Somewhere along the line there was obviously a ‘Eureka’ moment, resulting in the Bonobo bent-plywood frame. Bonobo, according to the press kit, is a clever blend of technology and nature. With correct upgrading of components and maybe the supplement of architectural-quality stainless or CNC-machined aluminum joints, possibly a Rohloff hub, Stanisław has created a brand new bicycle that’s sure to cause a stir amongst design toffs.

It certainly takes ‘green transport’ to another level.

Bonobo Plywood Bicycle
Bonobo Plywood Bicycle
Bonobo Plywood Bicycle
Bonobo Plywood Bicycle
Bonobo Plywood Bicycle
Bonobo Plywood Bicycle

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  • http://www.facebook.com/shawn.cerveny Shawn Cerveny

    Being a carpenter by trade and an obsessed bike geek I’ve got to say I’m thoroughly impressed with the design of this bike and would be inclined to think that the functionality would probably be quite good. Granted, the component choice is lacking, but otherwise, Very Cool…

  • www

    Flex.

    • http://www.facebook.com/shawn.cerveny Shawn Cerveny

      If you’re refering to vertical motion, akin to suspension, then youre probably correct. If youre referencing torsional movement, I’d wager this bike is much stiffer than you think.

  • defaultusername

    Should be able to buy one at Ikea any day now. 

  • http://profiles.google.com/slingstone49 Kyle McPherson

    I like that it’s held up by a teacup.

  • Daniel Torres

    Very Awesome. I wonder how much it weighs.

  • drewfitz13

    Anyone seen a ply wood chair delaminate and spill the person sitting in the chair.  This is a gorgeous design and i’m sure it is incredible sturdy now, but after riding it 100 miles or so, it’s going to be an entirely different story.

  • Gnevillebrooks

    I don’t think the designnis very beautiful butbthe concept is interesting. and no I’ve never seen a plywood chair delaminate with use, what were you doing with it?

  • TM

    The wooden bike thing was interesting a few years ago and a few exceptional examples pop up here and there, but it seems like anybody who builds a wooden frame gets featured all over the Web regardless of beauty, functionality, or technical prowess. The head tube, seat tube, BB mount, and dropouts are hideous and completely detract from what would otherwise be an elegant design, particularly the stays.

    • Grumpy

      “The head tube, seat tube, BB mount, and dropouts are hideous and completely detract from what would otherwise be an elegant design”

      Oh my good lord, you actually said that…these are obviously the best parts he could afford for this concept, so any comment about them is pretty much irrelevant. And yeah, all these design pundits going on and on about design…whatever next? You’d almost think that they would just shut up about all these things that don’t meet/match your personal aesthetic…how inconsiderate.!
      :-)

      • TM

        Grumpy: I wasn’t dissing the components. The actual frame – the bent ply and the metal I mentioned – leaves a lot of room for improvement. This is being presented like a finished product but it’s awkward geometry and construction make it look like there was little actual design thought beyond the plywood. Further, despite the pleasant aesthetic of the bent ply, this thing would be unrideable due to the width of that “top tube.” This is an academic exercise and I don’t think it deserves a free pass on the poor design elements. There are true craftsman who’ve put in decades learning to master frame construction, elevating it to a true art form, who will never get this kind of pub because they’re not working a trendy angle.

  • Niro

    No way that saddle is gonna hold!

  • Robvanravenswaay

    I want one. Very nice bike

  • Robvanravenswaay

    I want one. Very nice bike

  • telekom

    I like it. But some observations I would make:

    -I agree with other commenters that the headtube steelwork is a bit bulky. I think the frame design might be stiffer and more elegant if the two plywood elements actually join round the headtube, leaving out the steel.

    -I’m thinking another evolution of this design would address the steel plate/bolted construction round the joins. I think that’s going to be a weak spot in time, as the bolts will eventually loosen in the plywood. Perhaps the bolts could be made more secure by shrink-fitting a steel bush into the frame and then bolting into the bush with thread-lock compound (like you would use on motorbike bolts).

    -Having made sculptures in the past using laminated plywood, I reckon you could add aesthetic interest, and remove some weight from the frame, by chamfering/rounding the frame edges. I like the effect of the  varying widths of the laminates this gives. :)

    Not intending to sound over-critical, just my 2p on possible evolutions to explore. I totally admire the idea and the commitment required to produce this prototype. Well done.