Feather Cycles Lo-Pro

Feather Cycles Lo-Pro

Ricky Feather is one of the UK’s most prominent BMX riders, and is known for executing manoeuvres that, lately, have been the inspiration for fixed gear freestylers. Surprisingly, he’s also the builder of some of the most refined hand made frames coming out of the British Isles.

This is a low profile track pursuit frame for a Dutch customer who, needless to say, was more than satisfied with the result. The elongated angles of the lo-pro accentuate the simplicity of the track frame, but from a rear perspective it seems to have been pared back to anorexic dimensions. Constructed with Reynolds 853, 725 and a Columbus Zona aero down tube, however, is sufficient assurance that this frame will provide years of service.

Each frame that Ricky produces is further evidence that he is destined to become a respected name in the hand made bicycle world. His ‘Feather’ logotype on the down tube only serves to give the impression of lithe agility and the ability to grant the gift of flight. Keep an eye on his blog for the latest installment. Thanks to Kati Peschke for the excellent photography.

Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro
Feather Cycles Lo-Pro

  • TeeBee

    I must be missing something – how on earth can you ride something where your rear end is 6″ – 8″ higher than your hands? My back and wrists ache just looking at this!

  • I agree, this one looks awkward and unrideable. Incredibly well crafted, but awkward and unrideable.

  • Harry Farquhar

    Somehow riding doesn’t adequately discribe what a competent track cyclist does with a bike like this so in that sense it is unrideable. The bar to seat relationship is pretty typical for a pursuit or sprint bike although the small (650b ?) front wheel is a bit unusual. Reminds me a bit of the old Raleigh Olympic Superbikes fron the 80’s. Exceptional craftmanship on the frame particularly for a BMX’er!

  • Steve

    If you check through the archive you will find several photosets where the saddles are raised to absurd heights and the pedals are removed. I think it’s a photographer thing.

  • gkrollin

    If you look at the main pic you can tell its taken at an angle, as the back wheel is farther from the bottom of the image frame than the front wheel. This probably adds to the illusion of “unrideability”

  • What is the brand of the wheelset?